The Impact of Workplace Bullying

The Impact of Workplace Bullying

BUS600: Management Communications with Technology Tools

Prof. Bob Miller

 

 

The Impact of Workplace Bullying

Bullying is no longer only present in the “traditional” settings where many may think of bullying happening such as schools. Unfortunately, bullying is now happening online in cyberbullying and also at the workplace in workplace bullying. As Baack (2012) defines it, “workplace bullying is repeated, health-harming mistreatment of one or more persons” (p.7.4).   As Terry Wiedmer (2011) speaks about in Workplace Bullying: Costly and Preventable, workplace bullying has an impact on both the person being bullied and the organization.  The following will provide an overview of Wiedmer’s article, the effects of workplace bullying, and techniques that management can use to provide a positive impact.

In Workplace Bullying: Costly and Preventable, Terry Wiedmer (2011) describes how prevalent workplace bullying is becoming, and how harmful it can be to the victim. According to Wiedmer, 54 million Americans report being bullied at work (2011). Of those bullying, the majority are found to be men, the majority are found to be bosses, and they are said to be targeting more women than men. While this describes the majority, both genders are being bullied, and not all bullies are part of upper management. Bullying can happen company-wide and affect any employee. Wiedmer (2011) gives a profile of the typical workplace bully, stating that “individuals who engage in such uncivil and amoral workplace bullying tactics demonstrate common elements and behaviors” (p. 1). These bullies are often manipulative, obsessed with control, and charming when superiors are present. Wiedmer (2011) goes on to discuss how to stop bullying by first understanding what constitutes bullying. Managers should then show that the company will not tolerate the bullying, enforce an action plan, devise a workplace policy, and screen

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