Women’s rights / Article

Women’s rights / Article
AMH2010

(558 words)

 

In 1848 in the month of July a gathering devoted to women’s rights took place in Seneca Falls, New York. Only about one hundred people attended this convention and about two thirds of the crowd were women. Elizabeth Stanton a principal organizer of this gathering wanted to stand up for what she believed in and give women a voice all around the country that couldn’t speak for themselves. At the gathering Stanton developed her own type of Declaration calling it the “Declaration of sentiments, Grievances, and resolutions” that was a shot at the preamble of the Declaration of Independence that stated: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal.” Basically calling for the freedoms and rights between men and women to be equal in every form and way of life. It wasn’t until about 1869 that Stanton created the NWSA or in other words the National Woman Suffrage Association, which highlighted its efforts toward changing federal law and opposing the 15th amendment for excluding woman. It wasn’t long after that a woman by the name of Lucy Stone a antislavery advocate from Massachusetts and a prominent lobbyist for women’s rights, created the AWSA, which is the American Woman Suffrage Association that denied and rejected the NWSA’s plan to racially divisive and organize aim to a move on with a national reform effort at state level. In 1913 a suffrage march was held in Washington D.C. More than 5000 women activist showed up for the march and tried to make a change in what they believed in. For the next couple decades the NAWSA would work as a “nonpartisan organized focused on gaining the vote in states”, although there was a lack of managerial problems that led to success being limited by coordination issues. Apart from this only a few states would grant women voting rights, the first was Wyoming in 1869. Then there was three other western states Colorado (1893), Utah (1896), and Idaho (1896). After this many questions were brought up as of why the western states first? Some scholars suggest that the west gave this right to women for the overall fact that there were so few of them on the frontier. Many western states used the logic that if we grant them this right maybe more will move out west and populate our states. Others believed woman out west showed true hardship working and grit and they earned the more equal status to a man. It was no secret that women had it harder than men in the U.S for example sometime in 1916 Margaret Sanger opened the first U.S birth control clinic in Brooklyn N.Y. the clinic was shut down ten days later and sanger was arrested but that didn’t stop her from opening up a new one with the support of the courts in New York about 7 years later. Then the year 1920 came along and this is a notorious year for women all over the country because this was the year on August 26th that the 19th amendment to the constitution granted women the right to vote in the U.S. Although it was a hard journey for women to fight for their rights they didn’t let up on the gas and kept fighting for their voice to be heard, even though its taken several decades the Secretary of State finally listened.

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